About Exposing the Big Game

Jim Robertson

All-day alligator hunting proposed in Florida. The price? Rotting carcasses, irritated tour operators

  • David Fleshler South Florida Sun Sentinel (TNS)
  • Dec 6, 2021 Updated Dec 6, 2021

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — Florida has 24-hour restaurants and 24-hour gyms. Why not 24-hour alligator hunting?

The state wildlife commission has proposed adding seven daylight hours to the annual public alligator hunt, which typically takes place at night, making the activity a 24-hour-day experience.

Many hunters support the idea, since it would give them more options and take away the pressure to finish by 10 a.m., especially if they’re on the verge of nabbing a trophy-sized gator.

But some airboat tour operators say daytime hunting could scare away the very animals their clients are most eager to see. And alligator processors, who transform the dead reptiles into useable meat and hides, are not enchanted at the idea of receiving carcasses that have been baking in the sun.

“My biggest concern is people bringing spoiled alligators,” said Grayson Padrick, owner of Central Florida Trophy Hunts, whose Cocoa plant processes about 1,200 alligators a year, one of three processors who expressed concern about the idea. “Currently we see quite a bit of spoilage from the daytime hunting as it is. The skin starts slipping. You can take your hand and wipe them down the alligator and the scales will literally peal off in your hand.”

Alligators, one of the original members of the endangered species list, recovered so robustly that hunting was reopened on them in Florida in 1988. Florida is home to an estimated 1.3 million alligators.

Last year hunters killed 8,216 alligators in Florida, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The average length was about 8 feet, although seven came in at 13 feet or more and one topped 14 feet. The Florida record is a 14-foot, 3 1/2-inch male taken in Lake Washington in Brevard County.

At a meeting held by the wildlife agency Thursday evening in Moore Haven, near the western shore of Lake Okeechobee, only three hunters showed up to discuss the proposal. All three supported it.

“I think the 24-hour hunting is a big plus,” said Stephen Greep, a Fort Lauderdale hunting guide.

He said it can be difficult for his clients to fit a nighttime hunt into their schedules and that stormy weather can ruin their plans if hunting is restricted to certain hours.

“We have the afternoon thunderstorms that blow us off the lake at 5 p.m. till 11 o’clock sometimes,” he said. “There’s a lot of time, money and planning that goes into it, taking time off for that week.”

Jim Simon, of Moore Haven, who once got a 13-foot, 4-inch alligator on Lake Okeechobee, said, “There’s no reason we shouldn’t be able to hunt them all day long.”

Alligators have typically been hunted at night, when they’re more active and can be found with a spotlight by their red eyeshine. Hunters catch them with methods such as harpoons, fishing rods, spearguns and crossbows. Once they catch the alligator, they kill it with a bang stick, a pole that discharges a shotgun shell or high-caliber bullet on contact.

Alligators are a prime attraction for tourists exploring Florida’s interior, with visitors feeling they haven’t quite enjoyed the full experience without encountering the state’s most famous reptile.

“My people want to see alligators,” said Capt. Kenny Elkins, of Okeechobee Airboat & Eco Tours, who says his pre-COVID clients came from all over the United States and many foreign countries. “During the hunting season, they get very difficult to see.”

He opposes the extension of hunting hours.

“I don’t understand why they would want to do it,” he said. “To me, the alligators are more important to see than to kill. The alligator is worth more alive than he is dead.”

The state wildlife commission has set up an online information site on the proposal, with opportunities for the public to comment. If the proposal goes through intact, it will go in March for approval by the wildlife commission, a seven-member board appointed by Gov. Ron DeSantis.

More than 80% of respondents to an online survey found a 24-hour alligator “very acceptable” or “extremely acceptable,” said Tammy Sapp, spokeswoman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Brooke Talley, coordinator of the state’s alligator management program, said the extension of hunting hours would provide more flexibility.

“People will have more opportunity within their schedules to get out on the water,” she said. “That’s what we heard people tell us — I want to get out more, I work nights, I can’t get out at night. By allowing hunting during the day, we might be appealing to people who may not be as comfortable hunting at night, maybe the youth hunters. So there’s a lot of benefits to 24-hour hunting.”

———

Lawsuit Seeks to Stop Wolf Trapping and Snaring in Idaho

More than a dozen environmental groups are asking a federal court to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations.By Associated Press|Dec. 6, 2021, at 5:52 p.m.SaveMore

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/idaho/articles/2021-12-06/lawsuit-seeks-to-stop-wolf-trapping-and-snaring-in-idaho

U.S. News & World Report

Lawsuit Seeks to Stop Wolf Trapping and Snaring in IdahoMore

The Associated Press

FILE – This Nov. 7, 2017, file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a wolf in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. More than a dozen environmental groups are asking a federal court to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations. The Center for Biological Diversity and others in the lawsuit filed Monday, Dec. 6, 2021, against Republican Gov. Brad Little and others say federally protected grizzly bears and lynx could be killed. (Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service via AP, File) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By KEITH RIDLER, Associated Press

Lawsuit Seeks to Stop Wolf Trapping and Snaring in Idaho

More than a dozen environmental groups are asking a federal court to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations.By Associated Press|Dec. 6, 2021, at 5:52 p.m.SaveMore

U.S. News & World Report

Lawsuit Seeks to Stop Wolf Trapping and Snaring in IdahoMore

The Associated Press

FILE – This Nov. 7, 2017, file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a wolf in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. More than a dozen environmental groups are asking a federal court to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations. The Center for Biological Diversity and others in the lawsuit filed Monday, Dec. 6, 2021, against Republican Gov. Brad Little and others say federally protected grizzly bears and lynx could be killed. (Jacob W. Frank/National Park Service via AP, File) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By KEITH RIDLER, Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than a dozen environmental groups on Monday filed a lawsuit seeking to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations.Recommended VideosPowered by AnyClipBiden Administration to Rollback Endangered Species Rules Put in Place by Donald Trump63.2K2Play Videohttps://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.490.0_en.html#goog_292337858https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.490.0_en.html#goog_2022603713Ad: (20)

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The Center for Biological Diversity and others in the lawsuit filed against Republican Gov. Brad Little and state wildlife officials said the new regulations violate the Endangered Species Act because federally protected grizzly bears and lynx could be killed.

The groups are also asking the court to prohibit wolf trapping and snaring where lynx and grizzly bears are found until the case is decided on its merits.

For lynx, the conditions could cover most of Idaho except for the southwestern portion of the state. For grizzly bears, the areas would include portions of northern, central and eastern Idaho. Wolves are found in roughly the northern two-thirds of the state.

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“Traps and snares are indiscriminate and the dangers to non-target species are well known,” said Benjamin Scrimshaw, associate attorney for Earthjustice’s Northern Rockies office. “The failure to take any effort to protect threatened grizzly bears and lynx while pushing the slaughter of wolves violates the Endangered Species Act.”

The Idaho attorney general’s office defends state agencies in lawsuits. Spokesman Scott Graf said the office had no comment on the lawsuit.

In May, Little signed a measure lawmakers said could lead to killing 90% of the state’s 1,500 wolves through expanded trapping and hunting. It took effect July 1.

It was backed by hunters and the state’s powerful ranching sector but criticized by environmental groups. Backers said it would reduce the wolf population and attacks on livestock while also boosting deer and elk herds.

A primary change in the new law allows the state to hire private contractors to kill wolves and provides more money for state officials to hire the contractors. Idaho wildlife officials announced in October the state would make available $200,000 to be divided into payments for hunters and trappers who kill wolves in the state through next summer.

“The (Endangered Species Act) not only prohibits a person from taking a listed species, but it also prohibits a third party from authorizing or allowing a person to conduct an activity that results in the take of a listed species” the lawsuit states.

Besides setting up the reimbursement program, the new law also expands killing methods to include trapping and snaring wolves on a single hunting tag, no restriction on hunting hours, using night-vision equipment with a permit, using bait and dogs, and allowing hunting from motor vehicles. It also authorizes year-round wolf trapping on private property.

“In their zeal to reverse decades of effective, science-based conservation, Idaho politicians have not only endangered the long-term viability of Idaho’s wolves, they have recklessly promoted snaring and trapping that kill and maim both lynx and grizzly bears,” said Patrick Kelly, Idaho director with Western Watersheds Project.

State wildlife officials in late October said there had not been an increase in the number of wolves killed, but didn’t immediately respond with more recent numbers on Monday. A new wolf population estimate is expected in January.

About 500 wolves were killed in Idaho in both 2019 and 2020 by hunters, trappers and wolf control measures carried out by state and federal authorities.

In a related matter, Montana this year also expanded wolf killing.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in September, at the request of environmental groups concerned about the expanded wolf killing in the two states, announced a yearlong review to see if wolves in the U.S. West should be relisted under the Endangered Species Act.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — More than a dozen environmental groups on Monday filed a lawsuit seeking to block Idaho’s recently expanded wolf trapping and snaring regulations.Recommended VideosPowered by AnyClipBiden Administration to Rollback Endangered Species Rules Put in Place by Donald Trump63.2K2Play Videohttps://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.490.0_en.html#goog_292337858https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.490.0_en.html#goog_2022603713Ad: (20)

Biden Administration to Rollback Endangered Species Rules Put in Place by Donald TrumpNOW PLAYING

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Emperor penguin could be listed as endangered species

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The Center for Biological Diversity and others in the lawsuit filed against Republican Gov. Brad Little and state wildlife officials said the new regulations violate the Endangered Species Act because federally protected grizzly bears and lynx could be killed.

The groups are also asking the court to prohibit wolf trapping and snaring where lynx and grizzly bears are found until the case is decided on its merits.

For lynx, the conditions could cover most of Idaho except for the southwestern portion of the state. For grizzly bears, the areas would include portions of northern, central and eastern Idaho. Wolves are found in roughly the northern two-thirds of the state.

Political Cartoons

View All 346 Images

“Traps and snares are indiscriminate and the dangers to non-target species are well known,” said Benjamin Scrimshaw, associate attorney for Earthjustice’s Northern Rockies office. “The failure to take any effort to protect threatened grizzly bears and lynx while pushing the slaughter of wolves violates the Endangered Species Act.”

The Idaho attorney general’s office defends state agencies in lawsuits. Spokesman Scott Graf said the office had no comment on the lawsuit.

In May, Little signed a measure lawmakers said could lead to killing 90% of the state’s 1,500 wolves through expanded trapping and hunting. It took effect July 1.

It was backed by hunters and the state’s powerful ranching sector but criticized by environmental groups. Backers said it would reduce the wolf population and attacks on livestock while also boosting deer and elk herds.

A primary change in the new law allows the state to hire private contractors to kill wolves and provides more money for state officials to hire the contractors. Idaho wildlife officials announced in October the state would make available $200,000 to be divided into payments for hunters and trappers who kill wolves in the state through next summer.

“The (Endangered Species Act) not only prohibits a person from taking a listed species, but it also prohibits a third party from authorizing or allowing a person to conduct an activity that results in the take of a listed species” the lawsuit states.

Besides setting up the reimbursement program, the new law also expands killing methods to include trapping and snaring wolves on a single hunting tag, no restriction on hunting hours, using night-vision equipment with a permit, using bait and dogs, and allowing hunting from motor vehicles. It also authorizes year-round wolf trapping on private property.

“In their zeal to reverse decades of effective, science-based conservation, Idaho politicians have not only endangered the long-term viability of Idaho’s wolves, they have recklessly promoted snaring and trapping that kill and maim both lynx and grizzly bears,” said Patrick Kelly, Idaho director with Western Watersheds Project.

State wildlife officials in late October said there had not been an increase in the number of wolves killed, but didn’t immediately respond with more recent numbers on Monday. A new wolf population estimate is expected in January.

About 500 wolves were killed in Idaho in both 2019 and 2020 by hunters, trappers and wolf control measures carried out by state and federal authorities.

In a related matter, Montana this year also expanded wolf killing.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in September, at the request of environmental groups concerned about the expanded wolf killing in the two states, announced a yearlong review to see if wolves in the U.S. West should be relisted under the Endangered Species Act.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Ban hunting on Wednesdays and Sundays, “a good start” for some, a “liberticidal” measure for others

https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/ads?client=ca-pub-5838844690288514&output=html&h=280&slotname=7161770842&adk=3838197815&adf=4163492889&pi=t.ma~as.7161770842&w=680&fwrn=4&fwrnh=100&lmt=1638913117&rafmt=1&psa=0&format=680×280&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parisbeacon.com%2Fban-hunting-on-wednesdays-and-sundays-a-good-start-for-some-a-liberticidal-measure-for-others%2F&flash=0&fwr=0&fwrattr=true&rpe=1&resp_fmts=3&wgl=1&uach=WyJXaW5kb3dzIiwiMTAuMC4wIiwieDg2IiwiIiwiOTYuMC40NjY0LjQ1IixbXSxudWxsLG51bGwsIjY0Il0.&dt=1638913116264&bpp=13&bdt=4407&idt=1082&shv=r20211206&mjsv=m202112010101&ptt=9&saldr=aa&abxe=1&prev_fmts=0x0&nras=1&correlator=7850834547269&frm=20&pv=1&ga_vid=1828863037.1638913117&ga_sid=1638913117&ga_hid=942912532&ga_fc=1&u_tz=-480&u_his=1&u_h=640&u_w=1139&u_ah=607&u_aw=1139&u_cd=24&u_sd=1.2&dmc=4&adx=41&ady=906&biw=1123&bih=537&scr_x=0&scr_y=0&eid=31063858%2C31063866&oid=2&pvsid=1378824846804696&pem=840&tmod=1819393698&ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&eae=0&fc=1920&brdim=0%2C0%2C0%2C0%2C1139%2C0%2C1139%2C607%2C1139%2C537&vis=1&rsz=%7C%7CeEbr%7C&abl=CS&pfx=0&fu=128&bc=31&ifi=2&uci=a!2&btvi=1&fsb=1&xpc=krU1a2OoiI&p=https%3A//www.parisbeacon.com&dtd=1110

After a series of accidents, hunting has been invited into the public debate in recent weeks. It even became a theme of the presidential campaign, with EELV candidate Yannick Jadot considering banning his practice during weekends and school holidays if elected. A proposal that echoes that put on the table by the collective “Un jour un chasseur”, created by the friends of Morgan Keane, this 25-year-old youngster killed by a bullet while he was chopping wood his home.

Thanks to their citizens’ petition, launched on the Senate website and which passed the milestone of 100,000 signatures, they obtained the creation of a mission which will examine “the question of hunting safety”. Received this Tuesday by parliamentarians, they will explain to them the measures they defend, in particular that of the ban on hunting on Wednesday and Sunday. A measure that arouses strong and many reactions, especially among our readers.

“EVERY TIME PEOPLE LOSE THEIR LIVES”

In a recent Ifop poll for the JDD, 69% of French people said they were in favor of a ban on weekends and during school holidays. Some would even go further, advocating a total ban to avoid any fatal accident. Michelle is one of them, having experienced a personal tragedy several years ago. “Thirty-seven years ago my dad was killed while hunting, he was 53 years old. At the time, no judgment, no prison sentence… Since each opening of the hunt I have great apprehension because unfortunately each time there are people who lose their lives and, in addition, just because of one person. who will kill animals, ”she laments bitterly.https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/ads?client=ca-pub-5838844690288514&output=html&h=280&slotname=5531342010&adk=3162663158&adf=3566518525&pi=t.ma~as.5531342010&w=680&fwrn=4&fwrnh=100&lmt=1638913117&rafmt=1&psa=0&format=680×280&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parisbeacon.com%2Fban-hunting-on-wednesdays-and-sundays-a-good-start-for-some-a-liberticidal-measure-for-others%2F&flash=0&fwr=0&fwrattr=true&rpe=1&resp_fmts=3&wgl=1&uach=WyJXaW5kb3dzIiwiMTAuMC4wIiwieDg2IiwiIiwiOTYuMC40NjY0LjQ1IixbXSxudWxsLG51bGwsIjY0Il0.&dt=1638913116277&bpp=6&bdt=4420&idt=1432&shv=r20211206&mjsv=m202112010101&ptt=9&saldr=aa&abxe=1&prev_fmts=0x0%2C680x280&nras=1&correlator=7850834547269&frm=20&pv=1&ga_vid=1828863037.1638913117&ga_sid=1638913117&ga_hid=942912532&ga_fc=1&u_tz=-480&u_his=1&u_h=640&u_w=1139&u_ah=607&u_aw=1139&u_cd=24&u_sd=1.2&dmc=4&adx=41&ady=1822&biw=1123&bih=537&scr_x=0&scr_y=0&eid=31063858%2C31063866&oid=2&pvsid=1378824846804696&pem=840&tmod=1819393698&ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&eae=0&fc=1920&brdim=0%2C0%2C0%2C0%2C1139%2C0%2C1139%2C607%2C1139%2C537&vis=1&rsz=%7C%7CeEbr%7C&abl=CS&pfx=0&fu=128&bc=31&ifi=3&uci=a!3&btvi=2&fsb=1&xpc=joLUnpZqhD&p=https%3A//www.parisbeacon.com&dtd=1459

These hunting accidents, which are regularly in the news, have widened the gap between the French on this issue. Particularly when the victim was a stranger to the hunting trip. “These accidents are dramatic. I apologize because it is my role. But there are very few accidents in a year, they are very rare with non-hunters. We know that accidents can happen, zero risk does not exist. In twenty years, we have divided by four all accidents, whether fatal or bodily “, reacted in early November the president of the National Federation of Hunters, Willy Schraen.https://platform.twitter.com/embed/Tweet.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-0&features=eyJ0ZndfZXhwZXJpbWVudHNfY29va2llX2V4cGlyYXRpb24iOnsiYnVja2V0IjoxMjA5NjAwLCJ2ZXJzaW9uIjpudWxsfSwidGZ3X2hvcml6b25fdGltZWxpbmVfMTIwMzQiOnsiYnVja2V0IjoiY29udHJvbCIsInZlcnNpb24iOm51bGx9LCJ0ZndfaG9yaXpvbl90d2VldF9lbWJlZF85NTU1Ijp7ImJ1Y2tldCI6Imh0ZSIsInZlcnNpb24iOm51bGx9LCJ0Zndfc3BhY2VfY2FyZCI6eyJidWNrZXQiOiJvZmYiLCJ2ZXJzaW9uIjpudWxsfX0%3D&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1465986604481355777&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parisbeacon.com%2Fban-hunting-on-wednesdays-and-sundays-a-good-start-for-some-a-liberticidal-measure-for-others%2F&sessionId=686a9d8b440d8e7c73c2b5374cc3facb152988d2&theme=light&widgetsVersion=9fd78d5%3A1638479056965&width=550px

A trend confirmed at the end of last month by the French Biodiversity Office (OFB) in its annual report. According to the public establishment, there were 80 hunting accidents in total during the 2020/2021 season, including 7 fatalities, against 39 fatalities the previous season. An accidentology, which in more than 85% of cases concerns hunters, has been “constantly decreasing” for more than twenty years, underlines the OFB. And to specify that “the non-respect of the safety rules remains the first cause of hunting accidents”.

“ARE WE GOING TO BAN THE CAR BECAUSE IT KILLS?” “

The association “One day a hunter” estimates for its part, that many of them are not declared. The one Henri lived with his small family made him clearly fall into the camp of “for” the ban. Some time ago, he came close to the drama. He had stopped so his wife could breastfeed their baby. Four or five minutes after seeing a hunter, “the car door on my wife’s side was riddled with bullets. Luckily, it was only the car that was hit. The hunter was in tears but the damage was done, ”he recalls, chilled by this incident. One more for the activists to stop hunting.

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But for those who roam the woods on weekends in fluorescent vests, this “hobby” is much less dangerous than other activities. “Remember that there are more accidents, deaths, in disciplines that no one questions such as skiing, drowning in private swimming pools, even car accidents, domestic accidents … ban the car because it kills? “Asks Thibault, a hunter for whom, if days without hunting were to be decreed, it would be akin to” a liberticidal measure in contradiction with our constitution and its fundamental texts “.

FREEDOM TO HIKE VERSUS FREEDOM TO HUNT

A notion of freedom on which the pros and anti-hunters strongly oppose. For Danielle, the end of the hunt on Wednesday and Sunday “would be a good start! “. “For a small percentage of hunters who poison our forests, how many people are deprived of nature walks? », She asks. An idea of ​​sharing paths and forests between their different users that comes up regularly.

Catherine often goes for a walk in the Bois de Boissy in Taverny, in the Val-d’Oise. One day she found herself on a busy pedestrian path, just near private fields where a hunting party was taking place. “Our presence and that of our dogs disturbed them and they threatened us” to kill a dog if we did not get out of there quickly “. I felt deeply helpless and threatened because even if they were in private land, their guns were aimed at us, who were walking on a path accessible to all, ”she says. Since then, this grandmother has avoided this place with her grandchildren.https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/ads?client=ca-pub-5838844690288514&output=html&h=280&adk=3961055311&adf=3905514292&pi=t.aa~a.2972164917~i.28~rp.4&w=680&fwrn=4&fwrnh=100&lmt=1638913137&num_ads=1&rafmt=1&armr=3&sem=mc&pwprc=7336559860&psa=0&ad_type=text_image&format=680×280&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parisbeacon.com%2Fban-hunting-on-wednesdays-and-sundays-a-good-start-for-some-a-liberticidal-measure-for-others%2F&flash=0&fwr=0&pra=3&rh=170&rw=680&rpe=1&resp_fmts=3&wgl=1&fa=27&adsid=ChAIgKm8jQYQ8_nwsOyxuY9cEj0Au3TTA8YLz5kgaNqJ8PN2IjovktZenGRItAyWeBcG8CqotjGKAb1z_PFRDHslMw_NWFyI0vMNQxHZVNoZ&uach=WyJXaW5kb3dzIiwiMTAuMC4wIiwieDg2IiwiIiwiOTYuMC40NjY0LjQ1IixbXSxudWxsLG51bGwsIjY0Il0.&dt=1638913119291&bpp=7&bdt=7433&idt=7&shv=r20211206&mjsv=m202112010101&ptt=9&saldr=aa&abxe=1&cookie=ID%3D0c17c09433a7b3f3-228ca0abc8cc006c%3AT%3D1638913103%3ART%3D1638913103%3AS%3DALNI_MaESet8rkmVaYff2kDvQRiKF1AnbA&prev_fmts=0x0%2C680x280%2C680x280%2C300x250%2C300x250%2C1123x537&nras=5&correlator=7850834547269&frm=20&pv=1&ga_vid=1828863037.1638913117&ga_sid=1638913117&ga_hid=942912532&ga_fc=1&u_tz=-480&u_his=1&u_h=640&u_w=1139&u_ah=607&u_aw=1139&u_cd=24&u_sd=1.2&dmc=4&adx=41&ady=4272&biw=1123&bih=537&scr_x=0&scr_y=2748&eid=31063858%2C31063866&oid=2&psts=AGkb-H_z0czPpOII7KICBFT7SAY-0x1kkESKoIymgm-6ZzJm8buM80O7eJMdF-P1Jr9IJ6ooOF5-cnxgDg%2CAGkb-H9stblWLchnu5Bb7wfvpDNVqB3GdnUUdttdoP3EiQVULfe7oPblH4jiwGrI9gdzfcWlsOjMfInKtA%2CAGkb-H9-AhihklGN3tyqCwQPgb1PIgL–ZbfNwcsGE1xJe40Uyndpr1GBe9mysY7CsVpgtThzfsYBIYKt0qUGok%2CAGkb-H8I-CTWAGhQNq6CSiXPlLAeFVtEePwP7UR5sSc_K8jWDzQ1unEowNUZwaZz4oe0aaR4N4o8WpBoXQzLoxc&pvsid=1378824846804696&pem=840&tmod=1819393698&ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&eae=0&fc=1408&brdim=0%2C0%2C0%2C0%2C1139%2C0%2C1139%2C607%2C1139%2C537&vis=1&rsz=%7C%7Cs%7C&abl=NS&fu=128&bc=31&jar=2021-12-07-21&ifi=4&uci=a!4&btvi=5&fsb=1&xpc=7bUz4dSI1V&p=https%3A//www.parisbeacon.com&dtd=18349

Régine, she has a house in the middle of the fields and every Sunday from the opening of the hunt “it’s anguish, the hunters are all around me they frighten my dogs and horses with their shots”. To protect herself, she put up signs around her house, asking them to go further. “Most of them respect but some taunt us. It’s like everywhere there are good and bad ”, continues the one who denies being opposed on principle.

Tensions regretted by many followers of the hunt, which has a little less than a million practitioners in France. Pierre, a 36-year-old farmer, is one of them. Regular hiker, occasional fisherman, he is “firmly attached to all these practices”. Like many others, he goes hunting on Sundays, during the week he works “like many French people”. “Where I live, hunters and walkers respect each other and sometimes even merge. The neorurals must also get used to the traditions of the countryside, and respect private property, all the woods and all the roads are not public, ”he recalls.

MOST FORESTS, “PRIVATE SPACES”

And this is one of the arguments that comes up regularly to defend their right to hunt. Why ban when hunters are mostly on private land. “I am lucky to have my forest and to keep several hunting grounds. I tolerate the passage of people on my land, I pay land and forest taxes every year, no one asks my opinion to return home. Unfortunately, more and more people are coming to steal wood, fruit and mushrooms. Nature does not belong to everyone, between 75 and 85% of forests are private in our country, 100% of agricultural land is private too, ”recalls Flavien, who would prefer people to get along instead of banning.

“Most state-owned forests are not shot on Wednesdays and Sundays. Then, we talk about a maximum of 30 days a year out of 365… It’s insignificant, ”Josselin said. Emeline, a huntress, also considers it “disproportionate” to ban Wednesdays and Sundays. But, tired of the sterile divide, she says she is in favor, on a case-by-case basis and depending on the local context, to prohibit hunting “on a Sunday afternoon in an environment which would be very touristy and frequented, for example, and which would pose challenges. cohabitation difficulties see security problems ”. She would also like to change the image of hunters.

REGULATION OF GAME (SOMETIMES FROM BREEDING)

Just like Christian, a hunter since he was 16. Now 59 years old, this organic wine-grower hunts on the beaten path and maintains his territory “which benefits everyone”. “The densities of big game are such that the pressure on forests and especially crops becomes unbearable for farmers. Big game populations pose other problems, in particular the danger on the roads. Accidents are numerous and are sometimes fatal. But we talk less, “regrets the one who has just hung up his apron as mayor of a commune in Hautes Corbières. In France, there are thus 40,000 collisions each year between wild animals and cars.

A regulatory role in which another Christian no longer recognizes himself. At 74 years old, this Provençal remembers that when he got his hunting license at the age of 16, “when a wild boar was killed, it was an event”. “Today a beaten kills 100 to 150 in season, while the surfaces of agricultural and cultivated land, the woods have decreased dramatically. Today there is nothing traditional about hunting. Wild boars, stags, roe deer, partridges, pheasants and others are only products of breeding for commercial purposes. Most hunters are city dwellers. We hunt wild boar and deer with weapons of war that have ranges of several kilometers, ”he says.https://googleads.g.doubleclick.net/pagead/ads?client=ca-pub-5838844690288514&output=html&h=280&adk=3961055311&adf=149270552&pi=t.aa~a.2972164917~i.44~rp.4&w=680&fwrn=4&fwrnh=100&lmt=1638913144&num_ads=1&rafmt=1&armr=3&sem=mc&pwprc=7336559860&psa=0&ad_type=text_image&format=680×280&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.parisbeacon.com%2Fban-hunting-on-wednesdays-and-sundays-a-good-start-for-some-a-liberticidal-measure-for-others%2F&flash=0&fwr=0&pra=3&rh=170&rw=680&rpe=1&resp_fmts=3&wgl=1&fa=27&adsid=ChAIgKm8jQYQ8_nwsOyxuY9cEj0Au3TTA8YLz5kgaNqJ8PN2IjovktZenGRItAyWeBcG8CqotjGKAb1z_PFRDHslMw_NWFyI0vMNQxHZVNoZ&uach=WyJXaW5kb3dzIiwiMTAuMC4wIiwieDg2IiwiIiwiOTYuMC40NjY0LjQ1IixbXSxudWxsLG51bGwsIjY0Il0.&dt=1638913119332&bpp=8&bdt=7475&idt=9&shv=r20211206&mjsv=m202112010101&ptt=9&saldr=aa&abxe=1&cookie=ID%3D0c17c09433a7b3f3-228ca0abc8cc006c%3AT%3D1638913103%3ART%3D1638913103%3AS%3DALNI_MaESet8rkmVaYff2kDvQRiKF1AnbA&prev_fmts=0x0%2C680x280%2C680x280%2C300x250%2C300x250%2C1123x537%2C680x280&nras=6&correlator=7850834547269&frm=20&pv=1&ga_vid=1828863037.1638913117&ga_sid=1638913117&ga_hid=942912532&ga_fc=1&u_tz=-480&u_his=1&u_h=640&u_w=1139&u_ah=607&u_aw=1139&u_cd=24&u_sd=1.2&dmc=4&adx=41&ady=5908&biw=1123&bih=537&scr_x=0&scr_y=3843&eid=31063858%2C31063866&oid=2&psts=AGkb-H_z0czPpOII7KICBFT7SAY-0x1kkESKoIymgm-6ZzJm8buM80O7eJMdF-P1Jr9IJ6ooOF5-cnxgDg%2CAGkb-H9stblWLchnu5Bb7wfvpDNVqB3GdnUUdttdoP3EiQVULfe7oPblH4jiwGrI9gdzfcWlsOjMfInKtA%2CAGkb-H9-AhihklGN3tyqCwQPgb1PIgL–ZbfNwcsGE1xJe40Uyndpr1GBe9mysY7CsVpgtThzfsYBIYKt0qUGok%2CAGkb-H8I-CTWAGhQNq6CSiXPlLAeFVtEePwP7UR5sSc_K8jWDzQ1unEowNUZwaZz4oe0aaR4N4o8WpBoXQzLoxc%2CAGkb-H_v8cICNK0oq5IFXeZxt_yZQrFJVquhg-qVlqyyzc7_0UErwbnJNWbj3F6RI4aOTsyV6dZ-nlXqoQ&pvsid=1378824846804696&pem=840&tmod=1819393698&ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&eae=0&fc=1408&brdim=0%2C0%2C0%2C0%2C1139%2C0%2C1139%2C607%2C1139%2C537&vis=1&rsz=%7C%7Cs%7C&abl=NS&fu=128&bc=31&jar=2021-12-07-21&ifi=5&uci=a!5&btvi=6&fsb=1&xpc=ETs7EFPrbP&p=https%3A//www.parisbeacon.com&dtd=25437

Raising game for hunting purposes is indeed a reality in France. Each year, the producer sector raises around 14 million pheasants, 5 million partridges and 100,000 wild rabbits, all intended to be released into the wild, whether in metropolitan France or in the rest of Europe. “For several years we have been taken for idiots when talking about hunting as a regulation. The truth is, a majority of hunters only want to do live target shooting. The proof is that a good number of animals killed during these massacres are farm animals, ”concludes Alain.

Two visions of the hunt are therefore opposed, and seem irreconcilable. A divisive debate that will not fail to be fueled over the coming months by the positions of the presidential candidates.

Family speaks out about deadly hunting accident

https://www.wsaz.com/2021/12/06/hunter-facing-charges-after-killing-man-mistaken-bear/

Default Mono Sans Mono Serif Sans Serif Comic Fancy Small CapsDefault X-Small Small Medium Large X-Large XX-LargeDefault Outline Dark Outline Light Outline Dark Bold Outline Light Bold Shadow Dark Shadow Light Shadow Dark Bold Shadow Light BoldDefault Black Silver Gray White Maroon Red Purple Fuchsia Green Lime Olive Yellow Navy Blue Teal Aqua OrangeDefault 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%Default Black Silver Gray White Maroon Red Purple Fuchsia Green Lime Olive Yellow Navy Blue Teal Aqua OrangeDefault 100% 75% 50% 25% 0%By WSAZ News StaffPublished: Dec. 6, 2021 at 7:51 AM PST

UPDATE 12/6/21 @ 6:08 p.m.

BOONE COUNTY, W.Va. (WSAZ) – David Green’s wife Brittany Green is heartbroken after learning of her husband’s death on Wednesday, Dec. 1.

“Davey loved the outdoors, hunting, fishing, digging roots, and being with his dad,” said Brittany in a statement to WSAZ. “He had many cats and dogs and loved them all. He was always willing to lend a helping hand to anyone that needed help.”

Green had been picking roots along Preston Branch Road in Boone County, wearing a black shirt at the time. That is when West Virginia Natural Resource Police said Jimmy Castle shot and killed Green when he mistakenly thought he was a bear.ADVERTISEMENT

Investigators said Castle went to look with an acquaintance after realizing what he though was a bear could have been a person. They went back to the area but decided not to look further because the terrain was too steep. Castle said in a voluntary statement to police, he did not see anyone fall.

David and his wife Brittany were high school sweethearts. Brittany said his helping spirit and contagious smile are what he’ll be remembered for the most.

“Davey was a loving husband, son and grandson. We were high school sweethearts and married for seven years,” said Brittany Green. “He had a contagious smile, and he was the light of our lives. We are so heartbroken.”

Bruce Braisden lives down the road from where Green was killed. He said he has known Castle his whole life.ADVERTISEMENThttps://300f4a72eacd09c742bc2aeddb112917.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

“If the boy was bent down on all fours looking at a root, he had a black shirt on, you might think that would be a black bear, but Jimmy should not have fired until he knew exactly what he was shooting at,” Braisden. said

He said bears in the area are very common.

ORIGINAL STORY

BOONE COUNTY, W.Va. (WSAZ) – A man is facing charges after a deadly hunting incident.ADVERTISEMENThttps://300f4a72eacd09c742bc2aeddb112917.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

According to a voluntary statement given to law enforcement, Jimmy Castle, of Bim, West Virginia, was hunting on Preston Branch Road when he shot at what he believed to be a bear.

The criminal complaint states Castle left the area to find help after realizing what he thought was a bear could be a person.

When Castle returned with help, they told law enforcement they scanned the area and believed the item found near where Castle fired shots was a trash bag.

According to the voluntary statement, Castle did not walk to the extra spot due to the steep terrain.ADVERTISEMENThttps://300f4a72eacd09c742bc2aeddb112917.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

Officials say David Nicholas Green was shot and killed.

Jimmy Castle, of Bim, West Virginia is facing negligent shooting involving bodily injury or death and failure to render aid.

Keep checking the WSAZ app for the latest information.

Copyright 2021 WSAZ. All rights reserved.

‘Unique Situation:’ New details emerge in hunting-related shooting in Centre County

LOCAL NEWS

by: Bill ShannonPosted: Dec 6, 2021 / 01:20 PM EST / Updated: Dec 7, 2021 / 01:04 PM ESTjavascript:false

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CENTRE COUNTY, Pa. (WTAJ) — An 81-year-old man was flown to UPMC Altoona after being shot on the top of his head in what’s being called a ‘hunting-related shooting’ over the weekend.

State College police and the Pennsylvania Game Commission responded to the shooting in College Township on Saturday, Dec. 4. The man was found with a bullet wound on the top of his head with another man, the shooter, rendering aid, according to police. The 81-year-old was flown to UPMC Altoona.

NEW DETAILS:

On Tuesday, the Game Warden Supervisor from the PA Game Commission Northcentral Region, Mike Steingraber, said the situation was “not a typical hunting-related shooting incident.”

Steingraber stated that the shooter was not out hunting. He was driving his vehicle up his driveway when he thought he saw a deer in the woods. He then got out of his car and fired several shots after unholstering a .45 caliber handgun. His neighbor, the 81-year-old, was walking his dog on his property and was struck on the top of his head. The shooter then realized his error and rendered aid.One dead in tractor-trailer crash that closed section of US 322 

“Everything the offender did was wrong in the eyes of typical hunting,” Steingraber said.

The dog was reportedly wearing an orange vest, but because it was on his property, the 81-year-old neighbor didn’t have to be in one.

The neighbor is currently at UPMC Altoona and is said to be in stable condition. Investigators are waiting to speak with him as the investigation is ongoing. Charges are currently pending.

We will have more on this unique shooting incident on WTAJ News live at 5 p.m.

Montana seeks to end protections for Glacier-area grizzlies

https://news.yahoo.com/montana-seeks-end-protections-glacier-210410953.html#:~:text=Montana%20seeks%20to,in%20certain%20areas

FILE - A grizzly bear walks through a back country campsite in Montana's Glacier National Park, on Aug. 3, 2014. Montana is asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to lift threatened species protections for more than 1,000 grizzly bears in the northern part of the state, including in and around Glacier. (Doug Kelley/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File)
In this 2019 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) in Grand Teton National Park, Wyo. Grizzly bears are slowly expanding in the northern Rocky Mountains but scientists say they need continued protections and have concluded no other areas of the country would be suitable for the fearsome animals. The Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday, March 31, 2021, released its first assessment in almost a decade on the status of grizzly bears in the contiguous U.S. (Joe Lieb/USFWS via AP)
In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is a grizzly bear just north of the National Elk Refuge in Grand Teton National Park, Wyo. Grizzly bears are slowly expanding the turf they roam in the northern Rocky Mountains but scientists say they need continued protections, They have also concluded that no other areas of the country would be suitable for the fearsome animals. The Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday, March 31, 2021, released its first assessment in nearly a decade on the status of grizzly bears in the contiguous U.S. (Joe Lieb/USFWS via AP)

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Grizzly Bears

FILE – A grizzly bear walks through a back country campsite in Montana’s Glacier National Park, on Aug. 3, 2014. Montana is asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to lift threatened species protections for more than 1,000 grizzly bears in the northern part of the state, including in and around Glacier. (Doug Kelley/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File)More

MATTHEW BROWNMon, December 6, 2021, 1:04 PM·3 min readIn this article:

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana is asking the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to lift threatened species protections for grizzly bears in the northern portion of the state, including areas in and around Glacier National Park, officials said Monday.

The request, if granted, would open the door to public hunting of grizzlies in Montana for the first time in three decades. It comes after bear populations have expanded, spurring more run-ins including grizzly attacks on livestock and periodic maulings of people.

Removing federal protections would give state wildlife officials more flexibility to deal with bears that get into conflicts, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte said. But wildlife advocates warned of overhunting if protections are lifted.- ADVERTISEMENT -https://s.yimg.com/rq/darla/4-6-0/html/r-sf-flx.html

Northwest Montana has the largest concentration of grizzlies in the Lower 48 states, with more than 1,000 bears across Glacier National Park and nearby expanses of forested wilderness, an area known as the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem.

In March, U.S. government scientists said the region’s grizzlies are biologically recovered, but need continued protection under the Endangered Species Act because of human-caused bear deaths and other pressures.

Hunting of grizzlies is banned in the U.S. outside Alaska. Bears considered problematic are regularly killed by wildlife officials.

“We’ve shown the ability to manage bears, protect their habitat and population numbers,” Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Director Hank Worsech said in a statement. “It’s time for us to have full authority for grizzly bears in Montana.”

But wildlife advocates cautioned against giving the state control over grizzlies, after Republicans including Gianforte have advanced policies that make it much easier to kill another controversial predator, the gray wolf.

“We don’t believe that there should be hunting of these iconic, native carnivores,” said environmentalist John Horning with the group WildEarth Guardians. “I have no doubt the state would push it to the absolute limit so they could kill as many grizzlies as possible.”

The Fish and Wildlife Service had not received the state’s request and had no immediate comment, spokesperson Joe Szuszwalak said.

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, who oversees Fish and Wildlife Service, co-sponsored legislation while in Congress to increase protections for bears and reintroduce them on tribal lands. Haaland declined to say how she would approach the issue when questioned during her February confirmation hearings.

A legal petition to lift protections across northern Montana will be filed following a Dec. 14 meeting of state wildlife commissioners, said Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesperson Greg Lemon. The commission would be in charge of any future hunting season for grizzlies.

As many as 50,000 grizzlies once ranged the western half of the U.S. Most were killed by hunting, trapping and habitat loss following the arrival of European settlers in the late 1800s. Populations had declined to fewer than 1,000 bears by the time they were given federal protections in 1975.

Montana held grizzly hunts until 1991 under an exemption to the federal protections that allowed 14 bears to be killed each fall.

Protections were removed for more than 700 bears in and around Yellowstone National Park in 2017, but later restored by a federal judge.

Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon said in September he will ask the federal government to remove protections for Yellowstone region grizzlies and permit the region’s three states to manage and potentially allow hunting of the big bruins in certain areas

Robots Could Replace Captive Reindeer This Holiday Season

Exposing the Big Game

https://sentientmedia.org/robots-could-replace-captive-reindeer-this-holiday-season/

ByHannah McKay December 6, 2021

Last year, on December 23, a four-year-old reindeer named Smokeyescapedfrom a festive event in Liverpool, England. He spent a whole month on the loose before being darted by a vet and returned to his “owners.” Smokey was not the first reindeer to make a bid for freedom and he likely won’t be the last. This holiday season, he and thousands of other animals will be hired out and used as props in Christmas parades and displays around the world.

Meeting a reindeer in real life can seem like a ‘magical’ experience, especially for young kids. But what is it like for Smokey and his friends? “Reindeer are intelligent, sensitive, semi-wild animals,” says Isobel McNally, festive events campaigner at UK animal protection organizationFreedom for Animals. “They’re used to living in large herds with vast tundra to roam, where they feel…

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Wildlife Vet or Rehabber Needed ASAP

Exposing the Big Game

Today I received this message and photos from a friend in need who lives in rural Oregon:

IMG_1170

“F-ing bow hunters. I took this pic in my backyard minutes ago. Arrow sticking out his back, bleeding. How do I help him?! Do you know anyone who works with wildlife? This buck spent the entire summer with me….I can’t stop shaking. ”

Desperate to help the poor deer and hoping to find help getting the arrow removed, the friend had called the game department, who told her it wouldn’t be safe to tranquilize the deer. Next she reached a vet, who said she was in luck because a wildlife vet was visiting and that they would come over and see what they could do. Well, they never showed up! Here are some of the posts she made throughout the day:

“He’s laying down surrounded by the other bucks, does and fawns.  It seems as though they…

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New Photo of Deer With Arrow Stuck in Him

Exposing the Big Game

Here’s an update on the wounded deer I posted about two days ago: http://exposingthebiggame.wordpress.com/2013/10/25/wildlife-vet-or-rehabber-needed-asap/
If you know anyone who might have a new suggestion (aside from shooting him or doing nothing), or if you have experience with this and can determine from this photo what should be done to help this poor guy, please post it here or email: exposingthebiggame@gmail.com

IMG_1185

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Why Hunting Isn’t Conservation, and Why It Matters

Exposing the Big Game

laura c carlson, Canid Collapse, graphite, watercolor, and mulberry ink, 2020

ByKevin Bixby

Featured Image (c)laura c carlson,Canid Collapse, graphite, watercolor, and mulberry ink, 2020

In late December 2014, I received a call from a friend. He and his wife had made a gruesome discovery while exploring the desert outside of Las Cruces. They had stumbled upon the bodies of 39 dead coyotes.

I knew what had happened.

Wildlife killing contests are just what the name suggests. Participants compete for prizes to see who can kill the most coyotes, bobcats, foxes or whatever the target species happens to be. The animals are not eaten, nor are their pelts generally taken. They are simply killed for fun and profit. After the prizes are awarded, the victims are unceremoniously dumped, often by the side of the road.Coyote (Canis latrans)

Coyote (Canis latrans) (c) Larry Master, masterimages.org

The coyotes my friend found had been shot in a killing…

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