The pioneering science that unlocked the secrets of whale culture

Exposing the Big Game

Jacqueline Cutler  1 day ago

The pioneering science that unlocked the secrets of whale culture (msn.com)


Race against time to find missing submarine before crew runs out of airA deadly fight 33 years ago shows just how destructive a war between the US and…

Sigourney Weaver was in her Manhattan apartment, James Cameron in his New Zealand house, and photographerBrian Skerryunderwater, all over the world. Yet as each worked onSecrets of the Whales, each was struck with the same overwhelming sensation—awe.a bird swimming in water: Off New Zealand an orca seemingly tried to share a stingray with photographer Brian Skerry, dropping it at his feet. The orca circled the photographer who remained still a few times, and then picked up the stingray, later sharing it with another whale.© Photograph by Brian SkerryOff New Zealand an orca seemingly tried to share a stingray with photographer Brian Skerry, dropping it at his feet. The orca circled the photographer who remained still a few times, and then picked up the stingray, later sharing it with another whale.

They were moved by an orca trying to feed Skerry a stingray–there’s no other interpretation for what it’s…

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2 thoughts on “The pioneering science that unlocked the secrets of whale culture

  1. Awwww…..

    Doesn’t this song kinda remind us of whalesong? I think so:

    Right whales are on the move on the East Coast too, sadly the population numbers are lower than I thought:

    “A drone pilot caught some incredible video of an endangered right whale swimming Tuesday near the coast of Swampscott.

    Earlier this month a group of the rare whales was spotted swimming in the ocean east of Boston, prompting the federal government to urge caution among boaters. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said it is asking mariners to route around the area or transit through it at 10 knots or less until April 23.

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    Only about 360 North Atlantic right whales remain in the world.

    Right whales are on the move this time of year. The animals are often seen off Massachusetts as they head north.

    The whales are vulnerable to collisions with ships and entanglement in commercial fishing gear.”

    (Copied short report due to too many cheesy commercials)

    Liked by 1 person

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